Tag Archives: Community Engagement

Engaging WITH Homeless Adults

A few years ago, I (Rose) had the pleasure of working with a Seattle-based non-profit organization called Path with Art. This organization offers art classes to adults who are recovering from homelessness and believes in the life-sustaining power of arts engagement. I was impressed by their approach: Path with Art partners with teaching artists and […]

Happy New Year! | Looking Back, Moving Forward

  This year has been full of great collaborations, exciting changes and new opportunities for the Incluseum! As the year ends and we prepare to move forward, we are grateful for the time to reflect on the many projects we have been part of in 2015. Here are several highlights from our year related to the Incluseum […]

We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest

A year ago, a group of museum bloggers released a joint statement in response to the events that had taken place in Ferguson and beyond. The statement was accompanied by a Twitter chat that was facilitated by Aleia Brown and Adrianne Russell –#museumrespondtoferguson. They’ve continued to host #museumrespondtoferguson Twitter chats on a regular basis over the last […]

Announcing the Visitors of Color Tumblr

We’re excited to announce the launch of our collaborators Porchia Moore’s and nikhil trivedi’s timely new project: Visitors of Color. Underlying our field’s discussions on “diversity and inclusion” is a desire to serve more members of our local communities, especially those who have been historically (and are still currently) underrepresented among our visitors. These conversations are often devoid […]

The Open Museum in Glasgow, Scotland

I only recently learned of the Open Museum in Glasgow, Scotland. This museum is part of the broader Glasgow Museums and is focused on bringing collections to people around the city. Not only does the Open Museum has traveling exhibitions and handling kits, it works to develop exhibitions with and for local groups. As stated […]

R-E-S-P-E-C-T! Church Ladies, Magical Negroes, and Model Minorities: Understanding Inclusion from Community to Communities

We’re excited to publish a new post by our regular contributor Porchia Moore. In this post, she discusses assumptions and biases that hide beneath the use of the term “community.” How do you use the term “community” at your museum? Who comes to mind and doesn’t come to mind? This post is in line with many […]

Necessary Force: Art in the Police State at the University of New Mexico Art Museum

On Friday September 18th, I (Rose) had a chance to visit with Traci Quinn, Curator of Education at the University of New Mexico (UNM) Art Museum and see the exhibition Necessary Force: Art in the Police State that opened a week prior. The exhibition was co-curated by Kymberly Pinder (dean of the UNM College of […]

Building Community for Lasting Change

Hello everyone, we are back after a short summer break and we hope you are all doing well and are thriving! We’re kicking it off this fall with a blogpost post on community building co-authored by one of our friends and regular contributors, nikhil trivedi, Aletheia, and myself. Community building is foundational to creating lasting […]

An Intercultural Tool for Museums

Over the last few years, some of our blogposts have focused on the topic of intercultural dialogue, or how museums are devising and adopting strategies to facilitate exchange/dialogue between people of different cultural backgrounds. Simona Bodo introduced us to the theoretical underpinnings and practical application of intercultural dialogue in Europe and Patricia Lannes shared the project […]

Announcing the Department of Inclusion and Community Engagement at the Minnesota Historical Society: Part II

This is Chris Taylor’s second post to the Incluseum about his work creating the Department of Inclusion and Community Engagement at the Minnesota Historical Society. You can read Part I here. You can also access DICE’s Mission, Vision, and Values document here for more detail. What do you think? Do you have something similar at […]